Blog Tag Ozymandias

Refer to the extract below from the poem Ozymandias and answer the questions that follow:

…Two vast and trunkless legs of stone Stand in the desert. Near them on the sand, Half sunk, a shatter'd visage lies… Who is speaking these lines? What does the speaker of these lines speak about? Explain the meaning of ‘trunkless legs of stone’? Explain the meaning of ‘shattered visage’? Explain . . .

In Ozymandias by Percy Bysshe Shelley explain the lines: "The hand that mock'd them and the heart that fed"

In these lines "Mock'd" can have two meanings. The first meaning is usual meaning - "made fun of". the other interpretation is "copied," or "imitated." "Hand" is a used for the sculptor. So the sculptor both made fun of and copied the passions of the subject of the statue. &quot . . .

In the poem Ozymandias by Percy Bysshe Shelley explain the lines: I met a traveler from an antique land Who said...

The poet begins abruptly. A chance meeting between the speaker and a traveler who comes from an "antique land" is described. This traveler could be a native of this "antique" land, or he could be just a tourist returning from a trip to the "antique land". "Antique" means something really old. He is pro . . .

Explain these lines the poem Ozymandias by Percy Bysshe Shelley : ........whose frown And wrinkled lip and sneer of cold command Tell that its sculptor well those passions read

In these lines the traveler is giving a full description of the "shatter'd visage" that is lying half-buried in the sand. This "visage" isn't completely "shatter'd" because the poet says that a "frown," a "wrinkled lip," and a "sneer" can be still seen. It also . . .

Refer to the extract below from the poem Ozymandias and answer the questions that follow:

Which yet survive, stamp'd on these lifeless things, The hand that mock'd them and the heart that fed What does the speaker of these lines say ‘yet survive’? What are the lifeless things that the speaker refers to? What are ‘stamp'd on these lifeless things’? Why do the ‘passions’ still &lsquo . . .

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